A History of British Buildings with Harry Mount

Unit price

£35

Confused about your Dorics and your Ionics? Can’t tell your Perpendicular Gothic from your Decorated?

Author Harry Mount’s history of British buildings guides you, effortlessly and amusingly, through a thousand years of architecture, from Anglo-Saxon churches in Wiltshire to modernist villas in Hampstead.

All those Dorics and Decorated Gothics really aren’t so tricky to grasp. Look at a series of slides of beautiful buildings, listen to Harry’s commentary and, suddenly, the whole, glorious history of British bricks and mortar clicks naturally into place. Your walk down the High Street will be transformed for ever!

Harry’s course is divided into six 30-40 minute videos, shot at the old Idler Academy bookshop in west London. Each part is accompanied by a set of notes in printable pdf form. You can also ask the tutor a question in our online course forum.

Plus there is a bonus video of a special Meet the Tutor Q&A with Harry.

‘Harry Mount is brill, I love the content and the delivery.‘ Nick


Part One: From the Anglo-Saxons to the Classical. Length: 43:45

Part Two: British Classicism, from Christopher Wren to Baroque. Length: 39:16

Part Three: From Baroque to Neo-Classicism. Length: 33:40

Part Four: From the Greek Revival to the Gothic Revival. Length: 28:22

Part Five: The Glorious Freedom of Late 19th Century Architecture. Length: 28:23

Part Six: From the Edwardian Wrenaissance to Modernism. Length: 24:33

Meet the Tutor: Bonus recorded Q&A session with Harry Mount. Length: 42:48


About the tutor

Harry Mount is the editor of The Oldie magazine. A former New York correspondent and leader-writer for the Daily Telegraph, he is the author of Amo, Amas, Amat and All That, a top 10 bestseller. He has also written A Lust for Window Sills – a guide to British Buildings and his latest book, How England Made the English. He writes regularly for the Daily Telegraph, the Daily Mail, the Times, the Evening Standard, the Spectator, Country Life, the Times Literary Supplement, the New Statesman and Literary Review. He has a degree in ancient and modern history from Oxford (First Class Honours) and an MA in architectural history from the Courtauld Institute.